Cornerstone of Craftmanship – Don McDonald

Don McDonaldDon McDonald started working in construction at 20 years old. A year later, he completed the NCCER Certified Site Safety Technician (CSST) course at McNeese State in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Don accepted his first safety position that same year and has been in the field ever since. Working his way into safety management, Don has a passion for helping make the industry a safer place to work.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY?

A local industrial company offered me a job after I took and passed the CSST through NCCER.

HOW HAS TRAINING IN CONSTRUCTION IMPACTED YOUR LIFE AND CAREER?

Training has become a huge part of my career. I have completed numerous classes, including from confined space entry to crane and rigging training. Aside from working as a safety manager, I am also involved in training for Bo-Mac Contractors. I am an accomplished trainer in many of those areas, but my passion and expertise are in crane and rigging training.

WHY DO YOU THINK CREDENTIALS ARE IMPORTANT IN THE INDUSTRY?

Credentials are very important as long as the program taken to achieve them teaches what information is needed to perform the task safely. The integrity of a credentialing company also makes the difference.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR CAREER?

I enjoy seeing the people I train grow and succeed in their careers. It’s rewarding to know that I’ve passed on knowledge and impacted somebody’s life in a positive way.

WOULD YOU RECOMMEND CONSTRUCTION AS A CAREER TO OTHERS? WHY?

Yes, construction is a very large and important part of our national growth. It supplies many people with jobs to support families and enjoy a great living.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WHO IS NEW TO THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY?

Study and prepare for the craft which you choose to build your career in. Being able to succeed depends on how well you can safely perform your everyday job tasks. You should strive to become an expert in the craft so you can pass down that knowledge to younger coworkers.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE CRAFTSMANSHIP?

To me, craftsmanship is being able to perform a quality job safely and productively.